The Natural Remedy For The Common Cold/Flu (Elderberry Syrup)

I am not a fan of the common cold. I am equally not a fan of the flu. I am also not a fan of getting the annual flu shot. So what options are there if you want to stay well during cold/flu season but don’t want a flu shot?

Elderberry Syrup is a natural and preventative method for the common cold and flu (here’s proof). Elderberries have immune boosting properties, while ginger calms the stomach. Honey is a natural immunity booster as well, provides energy and is used a remedy for many ailments. When combined with cinnamon, honey can help cure the common cold, settle an upset stomach, and boost overall immunity. So as you can see, this is one power-packed syrup!

People who use elderberry syrup for illness get sick less often than those who do not, and if by chance they do happen to contract something they recover much less time if they are taking the syrup … anywhere from 24-36 hours as opposed to days with conventional methods (resource: this study).

You can buy elderberry syrup in health food stores or the natural foods isle in your grocery store … for nearly $10 for a few ounces! OR you can buy your own ingredients and make your own elderberry syrup for a fraction of the cost and have yields up to 2 CUPS per batch!!

What You Need

1/2 cup dried elderberries

2 cups filtered water

1 tsp ground ginger

1 tsp ground cinnamon

1 cup raw honey {processed, heated and filtered honey – aka most store-bought honey – has none of the healing properties of raw honey}

What You Do

1 – Combine elder berries, water, ginger and cinnamon in a pot and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 20 minutes.

2 – Remove from heat and allow to cool completely. This is an important step. Heating honey allows it to lose it’s healing properties.

3 – Once cooled, strain elderberries through a mesh strainer. Squeeze elderberries to remove any liquid. Discard pressed elderberries.

4 – Add 1 cup honey to the elderberry liquid. Stir well. Store in clean, sterile container with a tight-fitting lid. Store in refrigerator.

Dosage

During cold/flu season, give 1 tsp daily to children or 1 Tbsp daily to adults. Do not administer this to children under 1 as it contains honey. Some take this year round and double the dosage during cold/flu season.

If signs of sickness occur, give 1 tsp (child) or 1 Tbsp (adult) every 2-3 hours until symptoms no longer appear.

In some {not all} people, elderberries act as a mild laxative. The ginger in the recipe could counteract that effect, but if you find that you are in the bathroom more than usual just reduce your dosage and you should be fine.

ingredients – elderberries, honey, ginger and cinnamon (optional)

Does It Taste Good?

Yes. The syrup is very sweet (it would have to be with one cup of honey in it) and goes down easy. The smell while boiling the berries is very different than the finished product.

Where To Find Elderberries

Natural/Health food stores often carry elderberries. If you cannot locate any stores in your area that carry black elderberries (the red kind can be toxic), Mountain Rose Herbs carries them for $3.50/4oz. I have to order mine from here because there are no local stores in my area that carry elderberries {type in “elderberry” and see all of their elderberry products}. I have been more than pleased with the customer service from this company. I highly recommend them if you find yourself in search of elderberries.

So fresh that smiles are guaranteed

Comments

  1. Lyza @ Chic Shades of Green says

    Thanks for the directions, I have long heard of the benefits of elderberry syrup, but the price has always kept me from buying it. Your recipe calls for ginger powder, but would fresh ginger be better? I’m going to see if my “health” food store has elderberries.

  2. Lyza @ Chic Shades of Green says

    Thanks for the directions, I have long heard of the benefits of elderberry syrup, but the price has always kept me from buying it. Your recipe calls for ginger powder, but would fresh ginger be better? I’m going to see if my “health” food store has elderberries.

  3. Debi says

    Elderberries arrived. Health Hut for honey so I can get this made tomorrow! Can’t wait. You said daily you guys do this in the winter months, rights?

  4. Bethany says

    Hi April! I was sent to your blog via Jenn Tousey! :) I have a question about store-bought vs. homemade elderberry syrup and wondered if you could help. The store-bought syrup I have contains alcohol, echinacea, mullein, as well as peppermint, eucalyptus, thyme and myrrh oils. Are these safe to give children? If so, how much would I give a child weighing 30 lbs? Obviously, your homemade syrup contains very different ingredients and it sounds a bit safer to me. What would be your recommendation for giving young children? Thank you!!